Saturday, February 4, 2023
spot_img
HomePoliticsWorld NewsFeeling blue this Christmas? Here are ways to keep spirits bright for...

Feeling blue this Christmas? Here are ways to keep spirits bright for the holidays


The Christmas season is supposed to be a joyous time of year — but not everyone has the holiday spirit. 

Illness, loss of family members or friends, financial stress, loneliness or other worries can become the Grinch that stole Christmas joy for many. 

The “Christmas blues” or “holiday blues” are described as temporary feelings of anxiety and depression that occur around the holidays, due to extra stress, unrealistic expectations or sentimental memories associated with the season, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). 

HOLIDAYS ARE STRESSFUL FOR ADULTS BUT ALSO FOR KIDS, SAY EXPERTS: WHY PARENTS NEED TO WATCH THIS CLOSELY

During this time of year, some people might be at risk for feelings of sadness, fatigue, tension and a sense of loss, NAMI notes on its website. 

Seasonal factors may affect people’s mood quite seriously. Decreased sunlight, an increase in drinking alcohol at holiday parties, changes in diet, the over-commercialization of the season or not being able to see family or friends may all be factors. 

During this festive time of year, some people may be at risk for feelings of sadness, fatigue, tension or a sense of loss. But there are steps to take to banish the Christmas blues, say experts. 
(iStock)

It’s important to note that these moods are temporary, experts told Fox News Digital. 

“A mood such as a ‘blue mood’ is a passing phenomenon,” Dr. Mark Sirkin, a clinical psychologist in New York, told Fox News Digital. 

There are things people can do to turn that “down” feeling around.

A woman from Long Island, New York, told Fox News Digital that her holidays growing up as a kid and young adult were “like a Christmas card. We lived with our grandparents and siblings all under one roof, so the holidays were always so fun with a huge crowd and decorations.”

But the woman said now that she’s lost family members, the warm happiness of the holidays has been replaced with loneliness and a bit of sadness. 

“It’s tough reflecting on what [the holidays] were like vs. what they are now,” she said. 

INDIANA PRINCIPAL GOES VIRAL ON TIK TOK AS ‘THE ELF ON THE SHELF,’ PERFORMING HILARIOUS PRANKS FOR STUDENTS

Sirkin, who is an associate dean of health professions at Long Island University, explained there are things people can do to turn that “down” feeling around.

“Distract yourself, try to focus on happier thoughts and images, do something enjoyable preferably with others. These are all good ways to ‘treat’ a blue mood,” Sirkin told Fox News Digital.   

"Try to focus on happier thoughts and images and do something enjoyable, preferably with others," said one psychologist about handling the blues at this time of year.

“Try to focus on happier thoughts and images and do something enjoyable, preferably with others,” said one psychologist about handling the blues at this time of year.
(iStock)

The psychologist also said people should not compare themselves or their situation to others, especially on social media.  

“For every smile or laugh in a TikTok picture, there is a lot of reality that you don’t see,” said Sirkin.

Research shows that, for some people, constantly looking at the pleasures of others might actually make them feel bad, said Sirkin.

“Everyone has ups and downs — you, your friends, even those annoyingly happy people on social media.”

“Stop! Change the channel!” advised Sirkin. “Call a friend and have a real conversation. Everyone has ups and downs — you, your friends, even those annoyingly happy people on social media.”

He added, “Don’t focus on what you think you don’t have. Focus on what’s good.”

During the holidays, one psychologist said people should challenge themselves and say, "Why shouldn’t I be happy?" 

During the holidays, one psychologist said people should challenge themselves and say, “Why shouldn’t I be happy?” 
(iStock)

Doing something for others during the holiday season can brighten your mood, the psychologist said. 

However, it’s important that you also do something nice for yourself, he said — an issue that many people struggle with, he added. 

POLICE CALLED AFTER ‘COUSIN EDDIE’ HOLIDAY DISPLAY SPOOKS NEIGHBOR

People may think that they don’t deserve to be happy or have a good time, he said.  

“I put on the fire, watch a movie and pour a nice glass of wine to give myself a boost.”

“That’s irrational! Why are you less deserving than anyone else in your life?” he said. “Take a moment to remind yourself of something good that you’ve done or that happened to you.” 

Among Sirkin’s suggestions: Reward yourself with a nice dinner or some other treat. 

Also, challenge yourself and say, “Why shouldn’t I be happy?” and “I deserve to be happy.” 

"Interacting with others, especially people with whom you have deep relationships such as family, is a great way to get out of your funk," said one psychologist.

“Interacting with others, especially people with whom you have deep relationships such as family, is a great way to get out of your funk,” said one psychologist.
(iStock)

Margaret Palermo of Huntington, New York, agreed with the notion of treating yourself during the holidays. 

“I put on the fire, watch a movie and pour a nice glass of wine to give myself a boost during the holidays,” she told Fox News Digital. 

“They are my family — friends that are family — and I enjoy being around them. They help me feel a bit happier.”

Another suggestion from Sirkin: Interact with others. 

“Resist the urge to isolate yourself or crawl into a corner. Interacting with others, especially people with whom you have deep relationships such as family, is a great way to get out of your funk,” he said.

Louise M. of Long Island, New York, said she makes plans with friends to celebrate during the holidays, now that she does not have living family members.  

Thinking of others and interacting with friends and family can help people during the holidays, experts say. 

Thinking of others and interacting with friends and family can help people during the holidays, experts say. 
(iStock)

While it doesn’t replace her memories of Christmases past with her family, she can still create nice seasonal memories with friends, she said. 

“They are my family — friends that are family — and I enjoy being around them. They help me feel a bit happier.”

Exercise is another way to help battle the holiday blues, according to health experts.  

One woman enjoys walking around her neighborhood and looking at the holiday decorations and lights when she feels the holiday stress taking over.

Taking a brisk walk or riding a stationary bike indoors can get that blood and “feel-good” hormones pumping.  

This can help improve moods, physical therapists told Fox News Digital. 

RUNNING A MILE A DAY IS GAINING POPULARITY ONLINE: HOW IT CAN IMPROVE YOUR HEALTH

A woman in Annapolis, Maryland, told Fox News Digital she enjoys walking around her neighborhood and looking at the holiday decorations and lights when she feels the holiday stress taking over.

If it’s too cold or dark outside for a walk, she said she hops in the car, puts on some holiday music and looks at holiday lights throughout her town. 

For those who feel stressed during the holidays, meditation or mindfulness can help, according to one psychologist. It's a "verified method of getting out of a bad mood," he said.

For those who feel stressed during the holidays, meditation or mindfulness can help, according to one psychologist. It’s a “verified method of getting out of a bad mood,” he said.
(iStock)

Practicing meditation or mindfulness can also help, according to Sirkin. 

“This is an increasingly popular and verified method of getting out of a bad mood,” Sirkin said.

“Just sit: You can count your breaths, count to 10 over and over, or any other way you’d like to focus your mind. There are some good apps out there you can put on your phone,” he said.

People should understand the difference between feeling sad and dealing with a mental illness, said a psychologist.

Some health professionals said people can avoid stress caused by excessive holiday gift spending by setting a budget and sticking to it. 

One smart shopper told Fox News Digital that she puts a certain amount of money away and relies on sales and gift cards in order to keep to a budget. 

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

People should understand the difference between feeling sad and dealing with a mental illness, Dr. Sirkin noted. 

“If you think you might have a mental illness — if you have regular thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself, if you think you may harm yourself or others, if you can’t function at home or work — these are all signs of serious mental illness,” he said. 

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“You should seek out professional help, beginning with your physician or trained mental health professional,” he added.

This story discusses suicide. If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, please contact the Suicide & Crisis Lifeline at 988 or 1-800-273-TALK (8255).



Source link

RELATED ARTICLES

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

- Advertisment -

Trending News

Recent Comments

Must Read